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Wednesday, October 7, 2020 | History

3 edition of Liberalisation of the Mongolian pastoral economy and its impact within the household found in the catalog.

Liberalisation of the Mongolian pastoral economy and its impact within the household

Louise Cooper

Liberalisation of the Mongolian pastoral economy and its impact within the household

a case study of Arhangai and Dornogobi Provinces

by Louise Cooper

  • 201 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex, Research Institute of Animal Husbandry, Institute of Agricultural Economics in Brighton, UK, Ulaanbaatar .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pastoral systems -- Mongolia -- Arkhangaĭ Aĭmag -- Case studies,
  • Pastoral systems -- Mongolia -- Dornogovʹ Aĭmag -- Case studies,
  • Herders -- Effect of privatization on -- Mongolia -- Arkhangaĭ Aĭmag -- Case studies,
  • Herders -- Effect of privatization on -- Mongolia -- Dornogovʹ Aĭmag -- Case studies,
  • Household surveys -- Mongolia -- Arkhangaĭ Aĭmag,
  • Household surveys -- Mongolia -- Dornogovʹ Aĭmag

  • Edition Notes

    StatementLouise Cooper, Narangerel Gelezhamtsin.
    SeriesResearch report / Policy Alternatives for Livestock Development in Mongolia (PALD), a research and training project -- no. 8, Research report (Policy Alternatives for Livestock Development in Mongolia) -- no. 8.
    ContributionsNarangėrėl, Gėlėgzhamt︠s︡yn.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationii, 47 p. :
    Number of Pages47
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13594760M
    OCLC/WorldCa40048622

    There is little discussion of the growth in marketing related to other aspects of pastoral economy and society, and especially marketing as the engine for far-reaching changes in pastoral production; its impact on ownership and control of production factors, on gender, the location of power, livestock production itself including herd management. Compared to other civilizations, Mongolian women had the power to influence society and enjoyed much more freedom in general. Even though men were dominant in society, many turned to women in their lives for advice. While developing organizations within the Mongol Empire, Genghis Khan asked for assistance from his mother.

    Symbol Reflects on Persia's original status as a great power, until they were conquered by the Mongols Mongol Influence on Persia (Middle East) Accepted Cultural Aspects Persia Influencing Mongolian Empire As a whole, the impact of the Mongolian invasion was harmful on the. Mongolian empire facilitated interaction across civilizations by adopting the useful differences in each culture and passing it on to other cultures/places. Ex. 1) Passed on developed Chinese economy to Russia Ex. 2) Spread Islam to Russia and China Ex. 3) Shared Chinese writing and military weapons with Russia and Persia.

    For foreign investors such outcomes will likely continue to mystify those that persist on viewing Mongolian decision-making solely within a framework of market-driven or rational-economic bounds. Pastoral Nomadism. We badly need more analysis of the interaction between mobile livestock property and immobile territorial property [28] –.   China’s twelfth five-year economic plan marks a shift in emphasis from high growth to the quality, balance and sustainability of that growth. In order to achieve success, the country must face.


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Liberalisation of the Mongolian pastoral economy and its impact within the household by Louise Cooper Download PDF EPUB FB2

Liberalisation of the Mongolian Pastoral Economy and Its Impact within the Household: A Case Study of Arhangai and Dorngobi Provinces Format: Paper Cooper, Louise. This paper is concerned with the differential impact (by age and gender) of economic liberalisation on herding households in Mongolia.

The findings are based on five weeks field work in Dornogobi and Arhangai provinces carried out between August and October Author: Louise Cooper and Narangerel Gelezhamtsin. Mongolian pastoral economy and its impact within the household.

Research was carried out in two contrasting ecological areas: Erdene sum in Dornogobi province (in the desert-steppe zone of South-East Mongolia) and Tariat sum, in Arkhangai province (in the forest-mountain steppe zone of the Central-West of the country).

The organisation of research was the same in both areas. • Household. Cooper, L., & Gelezhamtsin, N. Liberalization of the Mongolian pastoral economy and its impact within the household—a case study of Arhangai and Dornogobi provinces.

Research Report No. 8, Institute of Development Studies. Brighton: University of Sussex. Google ScholarCited by: The Policy Alternatives for Livestock Development (PALD) project was established to research and make policy recommendations on the liberalisation of the Mongolian pastoral economy and its impact within the household.

The paper discusses the organisation of pastoral production at the household level from a gender perspective. The research was carried out as part of the Policy Alternatives for Livestock Development (PALD) project, to study and make policy recommendations on the liberalisation of the Mongolian pastoral economy and its impact within the household.

Research was carried out in two contrasting ecological areas: Erdene sum in Dornogobi. Liberalisation of the Mongolian Pastoral Economy and its Impact Within the Household: A Case Study of Arhangai and Dornogobi Provinces  Cooper, Louise ; Gelezhamtsin, Narangerel (IDS, ). Louise Cooper has written: 'The Initiate' 'Liberalisation of the Mongolian pastoral economy and its impact within the household' -- subject(s): Case studies, Effect of privatization on, Pastoral.

In the s the Mongolian government liberalized its pastoral economy, privatizing the collectives (negdel) and state farms (aj ahui) and selling off livestock to members of these pastoral institutions (Korsun & Murrel, ). A corrupt and chaotic process of privatization heightened the disparity in living conditions among rural households.

duced significant economic reforms, which may soon begin to produce posi-tive growth. Among former Soviet bloc nations, Mongolia's economy was the most de-pendent on outside assistance measured as a percentage of GDP. When the Soviet bloc disintegrated and cut off its aid to poorer socialist countries.

The men usually carry recommendations on the liberalisation of the out long-distance herding duties. This is Mongolian pastoral economy and its impact mostly for practical reasons: pregnant women within the household. or women with young children are likely to find this task arduous.

Pastoral societies were an alternative to the agricultural society. There was an amount of dependency on eachother neither society could really exist in the same manner with out the others production.

The Agriculture way of life was disdained by the nomads. Agriculture societies looked to. Mongolian economy has experienced steadfast growth for last 14 years. While the average annual GDP growth in stood at percent, in it increased to percent and fur.

Mongolia meanwhile has experienced a 2°C warming trend sincerecurrent drought, changes in precipitation and in seasonality and reduced water sources.

The detrimental impact of a changing climate manifests in the resultant rural poverty and out-migration to cities. Years go by with rainfall in one region and not in a neighbouring one. The Mongol Empire's economy was pretty good: stable, tolerant, effective, and efficient were almost no problems, except for the occasional burp (rebellions that were immediately put down, etc.); thus, it was called the Pax Mongolica, or the Mongol Peace (~13th century to 14th century).The Pax Mongolia was the period of time in which the economy, trade, as well as communication.

well as its geographical, social, cultural, economic and political situations. As a result, countries require a diversity of adaptation measures very much depending on individual circumstances.

However there are cross cutting issues which apply across countries and regions. The same sectors are affected by climate change, albeit to differing.

The result was disastrous: wide-scale overgrazing and pasture degradation. Since rural poverty has been increasing, despite overall growth in the Mongolian economy.

The provision of social and economic services for rural areas (including health care, education, transportation, communication, and credit) has remained poor or collapsed. A number of papers have been written in the west on the subject of the Cultural Revolution in Inner Mongolia.

Hyer and Heaton's () account of the period in the China Quarterly deals with events up untiland relies heavily upon an analysis of the news reports broadcast by Radio Inner Mongolia at that time.

The paper focuses upon the fate of Ulanhu, the Chairman of the Inner Mongolian. Mongolia - Mongolia - Daily life and social customs: Urbanization and modernization inevitably have had a heavy impact on nomadic traditions in Mongolia, but many of the distinctive old conventions have continued.

The ger (yurt) is always pitched with its door to the south. Inside, the north is the place of honour, where images of the Buddha and family photographs are kept.

Oyunchimeg, D. Mongolian Economy and Society inPotkanski, T. Decollectivisation of the Mongol Pastoral Economy (–92): Some Economic and Social Consequences, Rossabi, M.

China and Inner Asia: From to the Present Day, ——. Liberalisation of the Mongolian Pastoral Economy and its Impact Within the Household: A Case Study of Arhangai and Dornogobi Provinces, PALD Research Report No. 8, Brighton: IDS Cresswell, Tim. In Place/Out of Place: Geography, Ideology and Transgression.Impact of the Pax Mongolica The Pax Mongolica refers to the relative stabilization of the regions under Mongol control during the height of the empire in the 13th and 14th centuries.

The Mongol rulers maintained peace and relative stability in such varied regions because they did not force subjects to adopt religious or cultural traditions.Mongolia - Mongolia - Reform and the birth of democracy: Mongolia’s third constitution, adopted inwhich renamed the national assembly the People’s Great Khural (PGK), marked the beginning of the country’s transition—with Soviet assistance—to a modern industrial-agricultural society.

Darkhan, now one of Mongolia’s largest towns, was founded in